Blade Runner Versions

The history of the film Blade Runner consists of various subtly different versions or prints of the film.

US theatrical release (1982)
• Contains the voiceover narration included because the audience testing indicated that there was some confusion in understanding the film
• Contains the happy ending with Deckard and Rachel flying over mountainous country (pulled from unused shots created for The Shining (1980)
Amazon Video

 

The Director’s Cut (1992)
• Removal of the voiceover narration
• Removal of the happy ending
• Addition of a brief dream sequence with the unicorn running in a forest
Amazon Video | DVD

 

The Final Cut (2007)
• Contains the original full-length version of the dream sequence with the unicorn
• definitive version that underwent a restoration with Ridley Scott
• completely restored from the original negative
• scanned at the highest resolution available
• restored and remixed sound
• definitive version that underwent a restoration with Ridley Scott
Amazon Video | Blu-ray | DVD

 

Other Versions

• Workprint prototype version (1982)
• San Diego Sneak Preview version (1982)
• International theatrical release (1982)
• US broadcast version (1986)

Many other formats and available versions can be found with some investigation on Amazon.com. The more expensive collector sets have these other versions of Blade Runner available to view.

For more information, visit Versions of Blade Runner.

PKD Day 2017: Philip K. Dick and Vast Narrative

PKD DayThe second PKD Day to be held at Birmingham City University, Saturday, April 22nd, 2017.

This one-day, interdisciplinary conference will seek to explore the contours of the Dickian vast narrative, examining whether it is fair to talk about a Dick-iverse that is neither connected by narrative continuity (like Lord of the Rings) nor the repetition of characters and situations (like Marvel or DC comics). Furthermore, this provides the opportunity to explore how creators, commentators, industry and fans compete over the canonicity of different interpretations of Dick.

We welcome proposals for twenty minute presentations from both creative and academic practitioners, and from undergraduates, postgraduates, researchers and established scholars. Please send 300-word proposals to Thomas Knowles [email protected] and Terence Sawyers [email protected] by the end of March 12th 2017.

More information is included on the Philip K. Dick Festival website.